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Tomorrow (June 30) DEADLINE to register for the Cincinnati Mini Maker Faire (Sept 13-14)

June 29th, 2014 No comments

Everyone knows it is fast approaching, and we have not reminded folks enough, but tomorrow (June 30, 2014) is the deadline to apply as a maker to display your creation(s) for the upcoming two-day Cincinnati Mini Maker Faire at Union Terminal (September 13-14, 2014).

The website (image shown to the left) is at http://cincinnatimakerfaire.com/.

It has an APPLY NOW button to take you to the Exhibitor/Vendor application page.

You know you want to finish your project and show it off. Register now!

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HIVE13 wins Inventables 50 State 3D Carving Machine Giveaway Contest!

June 19th, 2014 1 comment

It is official. HIVE13 has won a Shapeoko2 CNC machine kit in the Inventables 50 States 3D Carving Machine Giveaway contest! Yes, it is for real!

The gang at Inventables (the hardware store for designers) is igniting the digital manufacturing revolution by launching this outreach program to get open-source CNC milling into (almost) every makerspace in the US. HIVE13 responded and is one of the 50 winners (and the only one in Ohio).

Shapeoko is an Open Hardware project started by Edward Ford in Dixon, IL. The name comes from a combination of the Shapeways and Ponoko laser cutting service names. The initial design (pre-kickstarter) was based around services provided by both companies. On July 26, 2011, 125 backers pledged $11,078 toward Project Shapeoko, far exceeding the funding goal of $1,500.

The ShapeOko is a Computer Numerical Control (CNC) machine which in its default configuration uses a light-duty rotary tool as the spindle. It is a 3-axis machine; able to move the mounted tool up/down, left/right, and forward/backward under computer control with some measure of repeatable precision. The giveaway includes beta access to Inventable’s Easel free cloud based app for design and fabrication, which goes full public later this summer.

Stay tuned for further announcements and visit the HIVE13 wiki ShapeOko project page for further details on the (to be scheduled) upcoming build nights and ongoing related developments.

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Tuesday June 10, 2014 – 2D CAD for Lasering Tutorial (Week 1 of 2)

June 3rd, 2014 No comments

Sure, 3D printing of STL models is all the rage. We can do that. But if you are laser cutting flats, you want to go OLD SCHOOL. Not quite as old as this 1930′s vintage drafting board, but as old as 1980′s era 2D DWG files. Join us at HIVE13 on Tuesday, June 10, for Week 1 of a two-week beginner’s tutorial on classic 2D CAD for laser work. Member Jim Dallam will take on this topic as our June “Second-Tuesday-of-the-Month” guest speaker. We will start after the brief 7:30pm business meeting. The actual tutorial will begin at 8:00pm and end at 9:00pm.

For this tutorial, we will be using the free DraftSight(R) CAD software from Dassault Systems. Here is the (download link) for the free version of this standalone, professional-grade product. Come with the software already loaded on your laptop and you can click along during this fast paced session. We will demo creating a simple geometry, then download the DXF file and cut it on the HIVE13 laser. Week 1 (6/10) will focus on the CAD work and touch on the laser. Week 2 (6/17) will touch on any lingering 2D CAD questions and have more laser focus. (<- PUNishment!)

Members, guests, first-time-walk-ins, and those interested in starting to climb the 2D CAD learning curve are welcome to come to our meeting and this Week 1 tutorial, Tuesday, June 10, at 8:00pm. (Find Us)

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Tuesday May 13, 2014, 7:30pm at Hive13 is Ham Radio Night!

April 19th, 2014 1 comment

Join us at Hive13 on Tuesday, May 13, at 7:30pm for Ham Radio Night. We will be welcoming Gary Coffey, Jerry Shipp, and perhaps others from the OH-KY-IN Amateur Radio Society as our May “Second-Tuesday-of-the-Month” guest speakers.

Amateur Radio is a valuable volunteer emergency communications service and public resource. Hear about the latest kit building and DIY developments in the field of radio art. Learn about upcoming events within the local amateur radio community; including ARRL certification and licensing opportunities. After the big one, these Ham Radio enthusiasts with access to a 12V car battery may be the only ones still on the air and communicating.

Members, guests, first-time-walk-ins, and those interested in learning more about the world of ham radio are welcome to come to our meeting and this presentation, Tuesday, May 13, at 7:30pm. (Find Us)

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HIVE13 Exhibits in the LVL1 Booth at the Detroit Maker Faire 2013

July 30th, 2013 1 comment

HIVE13 made its first Maker Faire appearance exhibiting at the Detroit Maker Faire 2013 on Sunday, July 28.  A special thank you goes out to our LVL1 Louisville hackerspace friends, Brad and the gang, who encouraged Jim to display some HIVE works in a corner of their booth on Sunday.

The HIVE banner, Galileo’s Finger, CinD-LOU’s eyeballs, and Jim’s kinematic sculpture ‘Life’ were prominently displayed and drew lots of attention throughout the day.  Mostly it was, “OK, what is this strange thing?”

LVL1′s fire-breathing animated and wheel chair mobile pretty pony Buttercup was still the star of the booth and LVL1 had a wide variety of other exhibits including a playschool pi computer, radiation cloud chamber, and a wack-a-shark game for the kids.  These guys are awesome and an inspiration to the rest of us.

The rain held off and a good time was had by all.  We should do this more often!

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HIVE13 has procured a brand-new MIG welder

July 10th, 2013 4 comments

It’s like Christmas in July!  The HIVE’s new MIG welder has arrived.  DaveB trucked it over and set it up on the cart just today.

HIVE13 is the proud owner of  a brand-new Millermatic 211 Auto-Set w/MVP (link) with the M-100 Gun (link).

This is serious equipment.  Electric shock can kill.  Hot parts can burn.  Fumes and gases can be hazardous.  Arc rays can burn eyes and skin.  Welding can cause fire or explosion.  Flying metal or dirt can injure eyes.  Build-up of gas can injure or kill.  Electric and magnetic fields (EMF) can affect implanted medical devices.  Noise can damage hearing.  Cylinders can explode if damaged, etc.   Only qualified persons should install, operate, maintain, and repair this unit.

Does this new tool sound like as much fun to you as it does to us?

Stay tuned and drop by to see developments progress as the experienced HIVE welders and prudently cautious implementers make preparations to enable eager newbies to learn to weld safely with appropriate precautions.

HIVE13 is the place to join to learn new skills and use new equipment to make things.

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Categories: Meta, Press Release, Project, Tools, Uncategorized Tags:

Project Spotlight: Electric Motorcycle

May 23rd, 2012 7 comments

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Last week, Hive13 member Rick showed off a rather impressive project: An electric motorcycle he’s building. He started it near the end of 2011, inspired by his father who started building an electric car years back but due to funding issues could not complete it. A lot of online resources helped greatly by providing information on what people had tried, what worked, what did not, what parts they were using, and so on. (Did I really need to mention that part? This is a blog for a hackerspace.)

Whatever its stage of completion, he says he has about 100+ miles on it so far and it can do 54 mph. (Update: This doesn’t mean the bike has a range of 100+ miles, but that he has ridden about 100+ miles on it so far. Actual range is more like 20 miles. Sorry, Hackaday.)

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The frame of the bike is a 1989 Honda VTR 250 he had around for spare parts for other bikes. To replace the Honda’s 24 HP gas motor, he used a common golf cart permanent magnet DC motor, 24 V – 72 V, driving it with a fairly standard 48 V electric controller. Four Optima Deep Cycle Yellow Top 12V batteries power it (two of them are visible in the top photo), and he added a 48 V charger to manage them. (Update: Batteries are AGM [Absorbed Glass Mat], not lead acid, for the record.)

Headlights, taillights, turn signals, and other accessories run from 12 V that a DC-DC converter provides. (I think this also included the ridiculously loud horn, strictly for safety reasons because the bike makes practically no noise otherwise. He says he’s only had to use it twice so far…)

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Rick estimated the total cost at about $2800, and that was using mostly new parts with warranties rather than used ones from Ebay. In addition to this, he purposely built it with a removable battery rack if we wishes to swap in a different battery type later on – he mentions LiFeMnPO4 batteries and a new controller & charger that would have added $1500 to the price, but would have increased the bike’s range and reduced its weight. (He put its current weight at about 400 lb total.)

Actual problems seemed pretty minimal. He made a mistake in the math when choosing the motor’s drive sprocket; a recent change in this brought the top speed from 35 up to 54 mph. The website from which he bought the battery charger advertised it as weatherproof, and he discovered it was not. He has some concerns about the motor getting too hot on hills or longer runs, and intends to add a temperature gauge and a fan.

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I also felt I had to ask a token stupid question, “What is it like to ride a motorcycle where you can’t rev the engine?” but received a fairly serious answer: “It’s weird not having a gas motor. The rev thing isn’t as weird as not having any kind of engine brake when you’re going down hills.”

The Flickr album of pictures is here (first 5 are courtesy of Dave Myers; remainder are my own until the last 5, which are Rick’s). Rick also provided some photos and videos of the initial tear-down, assembly, and first rides:

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(Disclaimer: Neither Hive13 nor Rick advocates riding without protective gear. The only reason this is absent in the pictures is that these were very short test runs.)

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Categories: Project Tags:

New Pinning Tray

February 20th, 2012 No comments

Hot off the presses!  Er, well, laser cutter!  We bring you the new pinning tray.  This tray is more portable than before.  The other one was small but the square shape often made it hard to fit into some carrying cases with your other tools.  This new design by Brian keeps the tray small but adds length to better go with the tools you normally carry.

And that’s not all!  With this new design you can use the holes on the side and a lid to secure your pins for further storage.  By placing a lid on top and using some small screws you can fasten the lid down and store the pins for later use.  This is ideal if you are working on a progressive lock and need a place to store your the extra pins until you work your way up.  It can also be used to keep some extra security pins grouped together or  potentially for storing the pins from control locks used in lock forensics.

We are still testing out the design but once we finalize it we will have some available if anybody wants one.

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LED table placecards

October 15th, 2011 2 comments

Inspired by this Instructables post, a friend of mine decided to create something similar for his wedding.

The bases were a bit more advanced than the suggestion, and all were created by a friend of the groom. They consist of a block of wood, a battery holder and 3 red LEDs.

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The plates were etched & cut on our laser over a period of about 15 hours. It was about one hour per plate, 12 of which we used, 3 were used to perfect the process. This video shows a time lapse of the process.  We had some trouble initially with clouding on the plate, especially around the letter “o”.  We fixed this by adjusting the power and speed of the laser and refining our post etching cleaning process.

After the plates were etched and cut they were soaked in water & simple green for about 30 seconds, then wiped off with a microfiber cloth.

The cards were then set up at the reception hall prior to the wedding, and remained lit throughout the evening.

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The wedding party:
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We didn’t have the names of all of the dates guests were bringing, so some people got their very own +1.

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And of course we had to create a bonus plate for the Hive:
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The Bride & Groom were pleased with the results as were we.  While it was a lot of work, the project resulted in a unique keepsake for each wedding guest and the wedding party.

 

 

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Glass Block LED Matrix, controlled outdoors via tablet

October 13th, 2011 8 comments

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Short version: Using an Android tablet, you can draw things on our Glass Block LED Matrix from the street, and it’s pretty awesome. Video here, photos here.

Long version:

Things have progressed recently on the Glass Block LED Matrix which Chris Davis and Paul Vincent started. For a couple weeks, the code was already in place to let Processing talk to it via simple serial commands to the Arduino & ShiftBrite shield. We wanted to use the tools from Project Blinkenlights to control things over the network; while this didn’t entirely work as planned, the project offered a lot of ideas and inspiration.

The most recent addition I made was the inclusion of oscP5 to the Processing sketch to let it listen for OSC (Open Sound Control) messages. As it happens, a brilliant piece of free software already exists (Control from Charlie Roberts) which turns Android/iOS devices into control surfaces that send out OSC messages. On top of this, Control comes with a handful of example UIs, one of them being “Multibutton Demo” which provides a UI with an 8×8 button grid, sort of like a monome. (The tablet in all of the photos is running Control with that Multibutton Demo UI.)

As our LED matrix is 7×8, this UI was a good initial match. I set Control’s destination URL/port to the backend machine that was running Processing, set the sketch to parse the pretty simple OSC messages Control would send out at every button toggle, and then I was able to control what was on the LED matrix by drawing on that 8×8 grid on my tablet.

I finally got to show it off outside on Tuesday evening when it was dark, and it’s working pretty well, as the video shows.

Next steps:

  • Making a Control UI that allows for color control. These are RGB LEDs, after all – we can control intensity and color, not just whether they’re on or off.
  • Making this web-enabled. I think Control allows this?
  • Fixing the glitchiness that I didn’t show in the video; something cryptic is going on on the Arduino side.

Check out the github project here and the project wiki page here.

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